3.0 MicroMODEL ROCK MODELING

3.1 Introduction

The Rock Modeling Sub-Menu appears below:

  1. Return To Main Menu
  2. Command Shell
  3. Create Rock Model From Sample Data
  4. Digitize and Display Rock Polygons in Plan View or Section(Menu)
  5. Create/Update Rock Model from Plan View Polygons
  6. Create/Update Rock Model from Section Polygons
  7. Create/Update Rock Model from a Grade Model
  8. Graphical Display of Rock Model (Menu)
  9. Update Samples/Composites from Plan Polygons
  10. Rock Model Manipulation

The purpose of the Rock Modeling Module is to produce a three-dimensional model of the deposit geology. The rock model can range from a simplistic rock/air model with only two rock codes, to a detailed model with up to 100 rock types as limited by the Reserves Evaluation programs.

Prior to building a rock model, a surface topography model with no unestimated cells must be present and reside in the current MicroMODEL project directory. This surface model must not be changed, once rock modeling has begun. If the user finds it necessary to change the surface topography model, the rock model must be reconstructed as well.

Within this module, MicroMODEL offers four methods to create a rock model. The rock model can also be created from surface files (refer to section 2.11). These four methods are:

  1. Rock Modeling from Drill Hole Data
  2. Rock Modeling from Plan View Polygons
  3. Rock Modeling from Cross Sectional Polygons
  4. Rock Modeling from a Grade Model.

The four modeling methods may be used in combination as necessary. See Volume I, Section 4.3 for a discussion of rock modeling methods.

3.2 Command Shell

This menu choice enables the user to invoke commands and run external programs without exiting MicroMODEL. Refer to Section 1.2.

3.3 Create Rock Model from Sample Data

This option allows the user to create a rock model based on the rock codes from either the sampled or the composited drill hole database. A rock model built in this way generally lacks continuity throughout the model, since no geologic interpretation of the drill hole information is performed.

The ANSWER SET NAME serves to identify this particular run.

Blocks are assigned rock codes according to the nearest SAMPLED or COMPOSITED drill hole interval. The user must choose which of these values to use.

INITIALIZING the rock model at the user specified BACKGROUND ROCK CODE causes each block in the rock model, located partially or fully below the topography, to be set at the background rock code before any block assignments are made by this program. Blocks that are located completely above the topography are assigned a rock code of 0 (zero). Any non-zero blocks that are not within a user specified range of a drill hole interval remain at the background code. Air blocks always remain zero. Before constructing a new rock model, the model must be initialized.

If the Data is ANISOTROPIC (i.e., is not isotropic), then the user must select the NO choice button under the question "Is the data ISOTROPIC?" Otherwise, the user should select the YES choice button.

For ANISOTROPIC geologic data, assignment of rock codes can be made based upon a three-dimensional ellipsoid of weighting. This ellipsoid transfers true distance to an ellipsoidal relative distance. This enables the user to control the direction and distance from which drill hole intervals are used for rock code assignments. In Figure 3.1, the block at the center of the ellipsoid would be assigned the rock code at point E since it occupies the nearest elliptical shell. See Volume I, Section 3.8 for further discussion of ellipsoids of weighting.

                FIGURE 3.1
                TWO DIMENSIONAL ELLIPSE OF ANISOTROPY
                SEARCH RADIUS = 100 m
                PRIMARY AXIS LENGTH RATIO: 100      
                SECONDARY AXIS LENGTH RATIO: 50
                ROTATION ANGLE: 60 Degrees
                "E" is closest
                "A", "B",  and "D" are equi-distant
                "C" is furthest away

The user can limit the distance from which an assignment is made by specifying a MAXIMUM SEARCH RANGE. Blocks that are outside of this maximum range from at least one drill hole interval remain at the background rock code.

If the data is not ISOTROPIC, then the user must enter the PRIMARY AXIS LENGTH, SECONDARY AXIS LENGTH, TERTIARY AXIS LENGTH, FIRST ROTATION ANGLE, SECOND ROTATION ANGLE, AND THIRD ROTATION ANGLE. For ISOTROPIC data, these values are ignored.

The user can enforce additional control over the creation of the rock model through the use of sub-modeling. This limits the extent of the modeling run to a fixed volume defined by the STARTING and STOPPING ROWS, COLUMNS and LEVELS. By default, these values are set to the first and last row, column, and level, as defined in the Project Information File.

Once a model has been created using the drill hole data, it can be verified using several grid display programs. If the rock model is not acceptable, it can be remodeled or modified using this program with different parameters, by using plan-view polygons, or by using cross-sectional polygons.

3.4 Digitize and Display Rock Polygons Plan View or Section (Menu)

3.4.1 Introduction

This submenu allows the user to capture and display plan view and cross-sectional rock polygons that are used in subsequent rock modeling. Blocks in the rock model are assigned rock codes sequentially in the order the polygons are captured. See Volume I, Sections 3.4 and 4.3 for more information of rock modeling conventions and methodology. The submenu appears below:

  1. Return To Submenu
  2. Command Shell
  3. Set Digitizer Communication Parameters
  4. Digitize Data in Plan View
  5. Plot Digitized Data in Plan View
  6. Digitize Data in Section

Options 1 - 2 perform as in all menus. Option 3 allows the user to hand enter digitized data, while 4 allows the user to digitize geologic data in plan view (as from geologic maps). Option 5 allows the user to plot the plan view polygons digitized by Option 3 or 4, while option 6 allows the user to digitize geologic data in section (as from drill hole cross-sections).

3.4.2 Command Shell

This menu choice enables the user to invoke commands and run external programs without exiting MicroMODEL. Refer to Section 1.2.

3.4.3 Set Digitizer Button Labels - Enable/Verify WINTAB

This option allows the user to enter the button labels for the digitizing tablet that will be used with MicroMODEL. This program MUST be run before the user attempts to digitize topography or rock zones. Once this program has been successfully run, the user need not run it again, unless the digitizer puck configuration changes.

Note: MicroMODEL (and PolyMap) now use the WINTAB driver. The Wintab driver must be installed prior to using the digitizing program. If you do not yet have the Wintab driver installed, you must do so before using MicroMODEL, or an error will be issued.

In theory, MicroMODEL should be compatible with any digitizing tablet that is supported by the WINTAB driver. Popular brands such as Calcomp, GTCO, and SummaGraphics are all compatible with MicroMODEL.

This is a multiple answer set program, so the user is first asked to select the answer set number. The ANSWER SET NAME is entered.

Next, the user enters a list of BUTTON CODES (labels). The button codes are the actual label of the button as it appears on the digitizer puck.

The user should check the checkbox which enables the WINTAB interface. This checkbox is provided so that the user can disable the WINTAB callup procedure, if at a later time the digitizer is disconnected for some reason. If there is no digitizing tablet hooked up, and this box is checked, then each time MicroMODEL is started, an error message is issued.

Finally, the user should press the "Test and Exit" button. This calls up another screen where the user can verify the operation of the digitizer. as the puck is moved on the table, the X-Y coordinates of of the puck should echo in the two text fields near the bottom of the screen. As each button on the puck is pushed, the associated button on the screen should become enabled.

3.4.4 Digitize Data in Plan View

This option allows the user to capture plan view polygons from existing geology maps. These polygons are used to model the three-dimensional rock model in plan view. The polygons are captured in global northings, eastings, and starting and stopping elevations. The digitizer captures the northings and eastings. The starting and stopping elevations and rock code for each polygon are specified by the user from the computer keyboard.

Use of this program is similar to that of Digitize Data in Plan View (Section 2.3.4). The user should refer to that section for details.

Rock polygons should be digitized in order of largest to smallest. For each rock polygon, the user enters the rock code, and the starting and stopping elevation that the polygon influences. For example, if the rock polygon is supposed to set a rock value for a single bench, then the starting and stopping elevation are the toe and crest elevation of that bench.

In version 5.0, there is a new feature added that should help in correctly digitizing rock zones. As each rock polygon is digitized, it is displayed on the user screen as a filled color polygon. Polygons of the same rock code are plotted in the same color. There is no control over which color is used to display which rock type. This display reflects the way in which rock codes are assigned by the digitized polygon. Basically, each block in the 3-D rock model will be given the rock code of the last polygon that encircles the block.

Upon completion of the program, the user is returned to the Digitizing Sub-menu. The file containing digitized plan-view polygon data for plan-view rock modeling (POLY.RKP) remains in the database directory until it is overwritten by another plan-view polygon digitizing session.

3.4.5 Plot Digitized Data in Plan View

This option allows the user to plot the plan-view polygons previously entered (either interactively or with the digitizer). The plotted output can be used to verify that the polygons have been entered correctly.

The user should refer to section 2.3.5, Plot Digitized Data in Plan View (Surface Data) for details.

There are two differences between the Rock Model version of this program and the Surface Data version.

First, there is an option to plot a range of rock codes, which is the Minimum Rock and Maximum Rock.

Second, the DIGITIZED DATA POINTS FILE NAME can be left blank, in which case the program will display the contents of the file "POLY.RKP." Otherwise the user may enter the name of any file that contains data in the correct format. If available, the user may also directly access a PolyMap data file, using the <PolyMap> command button. Refer to Section 2.3.5 for more details.

3.4.6 Digitize Data in Section

Geologic information is commonly recorded in cross-section. This option allows the user to quickly capture geologic data from vertical cross-sections with a digitizer. This data is used to create a rock model in cross-section. Rock modeling from cross-sectional polygons is discussed in Volume I, Section 4.3.3.

The cross-sectional polygons are captured in global northings, eastings, and elevations. The digitizer captures the northings, eastings, and elevations in cross-section. A TOLERANCE, which applies to both sides of the cross-section line, is specified by the user. This defines a rock volume which is used to assign rock codes to the blocks of the rock model.

This program works in approximately the same manner as the program to capture digitized data in plan view. The user should refer to section 2.3.4 for details.

A new feature of Version 5.0 is that the program will display only those digitized polygons that are part of the current section map being digitized. The method by which the program separates polygons from section to section will not work correctly on parallel sections that are closer than approximately 1.5 units of distance. The rock polygons are displayed as filled polygons, and polygons of the same rock code are displayed in the same color. There is no control over which rock type is displayed in which color.

Rock polygons that go to the surface (i.e. daylight) should be digitized above the surface approximately one bench dimension. This ensures that partial blocks located between the topography and the top of the rock polygon are not left unassigned during modeling. The Rock Modeling in Cross-Section program does not assign rock values to air blocks.

Upon completion of the program, the user is returned to the Digitizing Sub-menu.

3.5 Create/Update the Rock Model from Plan View Polygons

This option allows the user to take the plan view polygons contained in the file POLY.RKP, and assign the contained rock codes to the blocks in the three-dimensional rock model.

This program can be used to initialize the rock model to a single background code. Simply specify a file that does not exist as the name for digitized data. The program will warn the user that the file does not exist, but will successfully initialize the rock model.

If no previous rock modeling has been done, or if the user wants to start with a one-code rock model, then the rock model must be INITIALIZED. Initializing checks all blocks in the three-dimensional rock model against the surface model and assigns all blocks that are completely above the topography a rock code of 0 (zero). Blocks with 0 (zero) rock codes (air) cannot be assigned a non-zero rock code during modeling. If the rock model has not yet been initialized, then the user must enter a BACKGROUND ROCK CODE for all (non-air) blocks in the rock model. Blocks that are not contained within a rock polygon volume remain at the background rock code.

If the model has already been initialized, the system simply updates the blocks that are contained within the current set of plan-view rock polygons.

3.6 Create/Update the Rock Model from Section Polygons

This option allows the user to take the cross section polygons contained in the file POLY.RKS, and assign rock codes to the blocks in the three-dimensional rock model.

This program can be used to initialize the rock model to a single background code. Simply specify a file that does not exist as the name for digitized data. The program will warn the user that the file does not exist, but will successfully initialize the rock model.

If no previous rock modeling has been done, or if the user wishes to start over with a one code rock model, then the rock model must be INITIALIZED. Initializing checks all blocks in the three-dimensional rock model against the surface model and assigns all blocks that are completely above the topography a rock code of 0 (zero). Blocks with zero rock codes (air) can not be assigned a non-zero rock code during rock modeling. If the rock model has not yet been initialized, then the user must enter a BACKGROUND ROCK CODE for all (non-air) blocks in the rock model. Blocks that are not contained within a rock polygon volume as defined by the cross-sectional polygons remain at the background rock code.

If the model has already been initialized, then the system simply updates the blocks that are contained within the current set of cross-sectional rock polygons.

3.7 Create/Update the Rock Model from a Grade Label

This option allows the user to take a grade model and assign rock codes to the blocks in the three-dimensional rock model based on user supplied cutoff intervals.

Because the user is building the rock model from a grade label, the user must have a rock model to create the grade model. The user should create a rock model containing dummy rock codes. The updating of the rock model checks all blocks in the three-dimensional rock model against the surface model and assigns all blocks that are completely above the topography a rock code of 0 (zero). Blocks with zero rock codes (air) can not be assigned a non-zero rock code during rock modeling.

The ANSWER SET NAME is used to identify this set of answers.

The user may elect to INITIALIZE the ROCK MODEL by choosing the YES choice button. Otherwise, choose NO. If YES, then the user must enter the BACKGROUND ROCK CODE to initialize to.

Next, the user selects the grade model type and grade label for the 3-D grade model that will be used in creating the new rock model.

Finally, the user enters the NUMBER OF CUTOFFS TO USE, and, for each grade range interval, the CUTOFF VALUE and associated ROCK CODE are entered.

3.8 Graphical Display of the Rock Model

3.8.1 Introduction

The programs in this submenu enable the user to display the rock model in several ways. The options in this menu are:

  1. Return To Submenu
  2. Command Shell
  3. Printer-plot of grid values
  4. Plan View Cell plot of grid values
  5. Contour grid values
  6. Perspective view of grid values
  7. Plot Cell Values in Section
  8. Plot Angled Cell Section

The types of model display options available within MicroMODEL are:

  1. Printer Plot (digit map - not to scale)
  2. Plan View Cell Plot showing numeric cell values (scalemap)
  3. Contour Plot (scale map)
  4. Perspective View (three-dimensional fishnet - not to scale)
  5. Cell Cross-Section Plot showing numeric or color-filled block values (scale map)
  6. Angled Cell Cross-Section Plot showing numeric or color-filled block values (scalemap).

The Printer Plot, Contouring, and Perspective Fishnet plotting programs only access the current rock model from this submodule. The Plan View Cell and Cross-Section Cell plotting programs use the current rock model and/or available grade models as input from this submodule.

In most cases, the Printer Plot, Plan View Cell Plotting, and Cross-Section Cell Plotting options are the most useful for displaying the rock model.

3.8.2 Command Shell

This menu choice enables the user to invoke commands and run external programs without exiting MicroMODEL. Refer to Section 1.2.

3.8.3 Printer-Plot of Grid Values

This option allows the user to produce a single digit map of the rock model. Each digit represents a range of rock codes, with the key for the digits printed below the digit map. This map is best suited for quick verification only, because it is not to scale.

The ANSWER SET NAME is used to identify this particular answer set.

The user can instruct the program to print all values in the grid (no specified range) by selecting to Use Computer Search. Otherwise, the user may enter a range a range of values to be plotted on the printer plot. This range is specified by a MINIMUM and MAXIMUM VALUE. If the user enters a value range, cells outside of the range are specified by the appropriate "<" or ">" symbol.

The range of values, user defined or computer search, is divided into a user specified NUMBER OF INTERVALS. For example, given a rock model with rock codes 1 through 5, the desired range is .5 to 5.5 with intervals of 1 rock code each, the number of intervals would be:

    N = ((5.5 - 0.5) / 1) = 5

In this example, rock code 1 would be represented by the digit for 0.5 to 1.5. Rock code 2 would be the range 1.5 to 2.5, and so on. Air blocks would be designated by a "<" symbol.

With prudent selection of range values and the number of intervals, this program is very useful for quick verification and analysis of grid results.

Row and Column Clipping allows the user to plot a partial section (window) of the model area. The user defines this window with STARTING and STOPPING COLUMN, ROW and LEVEL, by entering these values into the appropriate fields. For further explanation on ROW and COLUMN CLIPPING, see chapter 8, Plotting.

3.8.4 Plan View Cell Plot of Grid Values

The Plan View Cell Plotting program produces a plot that numerically displays the assigned grid values for any existing grid in MicroMODEL. The plots can be produced at any map scale required. Several options are available which enable the user to design his plots as needed.

The user may plot any or all of the following values:

  1. Plot a KRIGE GRADE value
  2. Plot a KRIGE ERROR OF ESTIMATION value
  3. Plot a INVERSE DISTANCE value
  4. Plot a INVERSE DISTANCE ERROR OF ESTIMATION value
  5. Plot a POLYGONAL GRADE value
  6. Plot a ROCK CODE value

Up to 10 grid values, one line each, can be plotted in each cell. Generally, plan view cell plots become too cluttered with more than 4 lines of information, depending on the cell size and plot scale.

The user has the option of using multiple pen colors, or only one pen color for the entire plot.

The ANSWER SET NAME is used to identify this set of responses.

To efficiently use the space in each cell, the user can choose the orientation of the displayed elevation values. The HORIZONTAL direction plots the lines of information "across the page" oriented with the rows. The VERTICAL direction plots the information from bottom to top.

A LOCAL GRID can be displayed according to three LOCAL GRID PLOTTING OPTIONS. For further explanation on LOCAL GRID OPTIONS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

The GLOBAL GRID can be displayed on the finished plot. The character size is the same as specified earlier. For further explanation on GLOBAL GRID OPTIONS, see section 1.8 and Chapter 11, Plotting.

Row and Column Clipping allows the user to plot a partial section (window) of the model area. The user defines this window with STARTING and STOPPING COLUMNS and ROWS as prompted by MicroMODEL. For further explanation on ROW and COLUMN CLIPPING, see chapter 8, Plotting.

The user specifies the STARTING and ENDING LEVEL NUMBER to display.

The PEN COLOR to use for GLOBAL GRID LINES, LOCAL GRID INTERNAL LINES, LOCAL GRID PERIMETER LINES, LOCAL GRID NUMBERS, and LOCAL GRID TIC MARKS is specified in the second input screen.

Note: The number of items to plot for this program can be from 1 to 10. For each item, the user must select the label (rock or grade label), and, if appropriate, the grade model type (kriged, inverse distance, etc.).

The CHARACTER SIZE of the values are specified as a fraction of the row dimension. A character size of 0.25 results in plotted characters that have a height equal to one fourth the row dimension. See Volume I, Section 6.3.8 for more information on selecting character sizes.

A PEN COLOR is selected for each item. This pen number will be used if the user elects to plot using a single PEN COLOR, or if the user opts for displaying filled rectangles. Note: To suppress plotting the numerical values on top of filled rectangles, specify a pen color of zero (0) here.

Since it may be necessary to display values at a resolution smaller than whole numbers, the user can structure the output format by specifying the NUMBER OF DIGITS AFTER THE DECIMAL when prompted. If the user does not want to have any characters behind the decimal point and also does not wish to display the decimal point, a -1 should be entered. Refer to section 1.8 and to Chapter 11, Plotting.

In the Select Method for Label Pen Colors screen, the user can choose the method for plotting the values. The user can specify that a single pen color be used. The user can specify that multiple colors be used (values will still be displayed as printed numbers). Or, the user may elect to display the elevations in the form of colored filled rectangles. In this case, each rectangle is the same size as a model block, and the color represents a range of grade/rock values. The number of ranges, cutoffs, and pen colors are entered in the Color Ranges screen.

The Range Limits Screen allows the entry of LOWER and UPPER CUTOFF VALUES for the grade/rock value grid. They can be used to minimize plotting of unwanted cells. A cell that contains a value outside of its cutoff range is left blank.

The user selects the number of cutoffs, cutoff values, and pen colors for each range in the Color Ranges screen.

The TITLE BLOCK COLUMN questions are for modifying the PLOT FRAME, TITLE BLOCK or SCALE. PLOT FRAME questions deal with the PLOT FRAME EXTENT SPACE and PEN COLOR of the PLOT FRAME EXTENT LINE. The TITLE BLOCK questions concern the dimensions of the SIDE BOX, the TITLE BOX, and the COMPANY NAME BOX. The user specifies widths and heights, the title names, character heights, project number, figure number and the PEN COLOR of the internal lines. The SCALE questions control the number of intervals, the length of the intervals, the PEN COLOR and the maximum expected plot scale. For a complete discussion of the TITLE BLOCK QUESTIONS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

The Plan View Cell Plotting program produces a scaled plot that can be output at any user specified map scale (see Volume I, Section 6.3.7). For further explanation on SCALE OF PLOTS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

3.8.5 Contour Grid Values

When accessed from the Rock Modeling submenu, the Contouring program produces isopleth maps of the rock model for a particular bench. This program may be applicable in some conditions. Some experimentation with the program parameters may be necessary to produce useful results.

The user can design the contour maps as needed by invoking a variety of plotting options. The contour plots can be produced at any map scale.

The user should refer to section 2.9.5, Contour Grid Values (Surface Data), for details. The only difference between rock contouring and surface contouring is that the user must specify the level number to contour, in addition to the row and column limits.

3.8.6 Perspective View of Grid Values

This option allows the user to produce a three-dimensional fishnet view of the rock model on a user specified bench. The output created by this program displays higher rock codes as peaks, while lower rock codes appear as valleys. The plots generated by this program are usually used for verification of modeling, visualization assistance, and report preparation rather than for producing actual working maps.

The user should refer to section 2.9.6, Perspective View of Grid Values (Surface Data), for details. The only difference between rock perspective plotting and surface perspective plotting is that the user must specify the level number to display, in addition to the row and column limits.

3.8.7 Plot Cell Values in Section

The Cell Cross-Section option produces a cross-section of the block values for the rock model and any grade model through any row or column in the model. It does not work on any diagonal. Use the next option, 3.8.8, Plot Angled Cell Section, to plot on a diagonal. In the same manner as the Plan View Cell Plotting program, this program produces a plot that numerically, or with color-filled rectangles, displays the assigned grid values for any existing grid in MicroMODEL. The plots can be produced at any map scale needed. Several options are available which enable the user to design his plots.

The user may plot any or all of the following values:

  1. Plot a KRIGE GRADE value
  2. Plot a KRIGE ERROR OF ESTIMATION value
  3. Plot a INVERSE DISTANCE value
  4. Plot a INVERSE DISTANCE ERROR OF ESTIMATION value
  5. Plot a POLYGONAL GRADE value
  6. Plot a ROCK CODE value

Up to 10 grid values, one line each, may be plotted in each cross-section block. Generally, block cross-section plots become too cluttered with more than 4 lines of information, depending upon the bench height, cell size, and plot scale.

The user has the option of using one pen color, multiple pen colors, or color-filled rectangles for each item that is displayed.

The ANSWER SET NAME is used to identify this set of responses.

To efficiently use the space in each cell, the user can choose the orientation of the displayed elevation values. The HORIZONTAL direction plots the lines of information "across the page" oriented with the rows. The VERTICAL direction plots the information from bottom to top.

A LOCAL GRID can be displayed according to three LOCAL GRID PLOTTING OPTIONS. For further explanation on LOCAL GRID OPTIONS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

This program plots items along either a single row, or single column, in the model. The user must choose what to plot (ROW or COLUMN).

The user then plots the Row and Column Ranges to display. For further explanation on ROW and COLUMN CLIPPING, see chapter 8, Plotting.

The STARTING and ENDING LEVEL to display are entered. This allows the user to select which vertical slice of blocks to display.

A VERTICAL SCALE FACTOR can be entered, which will either exaggerate or shrink the scale of the plot in the vertical direction. Normally, this value is set to 1.0, so that the vertical and horizontal scales are the same. A scale factor greater than one will exaggerate the vertical scale, while a scale factor less than one will shrink the vertical scale.

Entering the ELEVATION GRID INTERVAL allows the user to display a regular grid of horizontal elevation lines at the specified interval. Enter zero (0.0) here to suppress the plotting of horizontal elevation lines. Otherwise, enter a value greater than zero. For example, Entering 100.0 here will make the program plot an elevation line every 100 units.

The PEN COLOR to use for GLOBAL GRID LINES, LOCAL GRID INTERNAL LINES, LOCAL GRID PERIMETER LINES, LOCAL GRID NUMBERS, LOCAL GRID TIC MARKS, ELEVATION LINES, and TOPOGRAPHY CONTOUR LINE is specified in the second input screen.

A choice box at the bottom of this screen allows the user to specify whether or not to plot the topography contour line. Electing to plot the topography line will cause the program to draw the original topography profile line on the section in the pen color selected.

Note: The number of items to plot for this program can be from 1 to 10. For each item, the user must select the label (rock or grade label), and, if appropriate, the grade model type (kriged, inverse distance, etc.).

The CHARACTER SIZE of the values are specified as a fraction of the row dimension. A character size of 0.25 results in plotted characters that have a height equal to one fourth the row dimension. See Volume I, Section 6.3.8 for more information on selecting character sizes.

A PEN COLOR is selected for each item. This pen number will be used if the user elects to plot using a single PEN COLOR, or if the user opts for displaying filled rectangles. Note: To suppress plotting the numerical values on top of filled rectangles, specify a pen color of zero (0) here.

Since it may be necessary to display values at a resolution smaller than whole numbers, the user can structure the output format by specifying the NUMBER OF DIGITS AFTER THE DECIMAL when prompted. If the user does not want to have any characters behind the decimal point and also does not wish to display the decimal point, a -1 should be entered. Refer to section 1.8 and to Chapter 11, Plotting.

In the Select Method for Label Pen Colors screen, the user can choose the method for plotting the values. The user can specify that a single pen color be used. The user can specify that multiple colors be used (values will still be displayed as printed numbers). Or, the user may elect to display the elevations in the form of colored filled rectangles. In this case, each rectangle is the same size as a model block, and the color represents a range of grade/rock values. The number of ranges, cutoffs, and pen numbers are entered in the Color Ranges screen.

The Range Limits Screen allows the entry of LOWER and UPPER CUTOFF VALUES for the grade/rock value grid. They can be used to minimize plotting of unwanted cells. A cell that contains a value outside of its cutoff range is left blank.

The user selects the number of cutoffs, cutoff values, and pen colors for each range in the Color Ranges screen.

The TITLE BLOCK COLUMN questions are for modifying the PLOT FRAME, TITLE BLOCK or SCALE. PLOT FRAME questions deal with the PLOT FRAME EXTENT SPACE and PEN COLOR of the PLOT FRAME EXTENT LINE. The TITLE BLOCK questions concern the dimensions of the SIDE BOX, the TITLE BOX, and the COMPANY NAME BOX. The user specifies widths and heights, the title names, character heights, project number, figure number and the PEN COLOR of the internal lines. The SCALE questions control the number of intervals, the length of the intervals, the PEN COLOR and the maximum expected plot scale. For a complete discussion of the TITLE BLOCK QUESTIONS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

The Section Plotting program produces a scaled plot that can be output at any user specified map scale (see Volume I, Section 6.3.7). For further explanation on SCALE OF PLOTS, see Chapter 11, Plotting.

3.8.8 Plot Cell Values in Angled Section

The Angled Cell Cross-Section option produces a cross-section of the block values for the rock model along any diagonal in the model.

This program works in exactly the same manner as the previous option (3.8.7 - Plot Cell Values in Section), with one exception. Instead of plotting block values along a section or row, this program plots the values along any diagonal in the model.

Row and Column plot limits are replaced by four entry fields where the user enters the LEFTHAND EASTING, LEFTHAND NORTHING, RIGHTHAND EASTING, and RIGHTHAND NORTHING.

In general, if the diagonal runs mainly East-West through the model, then the blocks will be displayed as a series of adjacent columns. If the diagonal runs mainly North-South, then the blocks will be displayed as a series of adjacent rows. Select the local grid option to plot either tic marks, or a full local grid, to see a printout of row and column for each vertical column of blocks that plot.

3.9 Update Smples/Composites from Plan Polygons

This option allows the user to update sample or composite

3.10 Rock Model Manipulation

This option allows the user to perform several different types of mathematical and logical operations on up to eight grade labels. Manipulations may also be made with the rock model. The results of the operations can be written into any existing grade label, or the rock model. This option is especially useful for the creation of synthesized data, such as data that has been limited to a given minimum or maximum value.

This option works in exactly the same manner as the program described in section 1.14, Sample Manipulation. The user should refer to that section for details. The only difference is that, in addition to specifying the input and output label type(s), the user must also specify the model type(s).