9.0 MicroMODEL SPECIAL TOOLS

9.1 Introduction

The Special Tools Sub-Menu appears below:

  1. Return To Main Menu
  2. Command Shell
  3. Move Grid Files from One Setup to Another
  4. Calculate OPD Reserves Based on a Matrix
  5. Adjust Rock Model Values for New Topography Grid
  6. Count Rock Codes in Blocks, Samples, or Composites
  7. Create Rock Interval Information Coding File
  8. Update Rock Intervals Based on Coding File
  9. Calculate Confidence Codes Based on Triangulation
  10. Calculate Dump Volume from Digitized Contours
  11. Check Drillhole Collars Against Topo Grid
  12. Create X-Y-Z Data File from Seam Outcrop Locations
  13. Plot Downhole Intercept Locations

This module gives the user access to a number of special add-on programs that were written to perform tasks that could not be handled by the standard set of MicroMODEL programs. In a future release of MicroMODEL, these tools may or may not be incorporated directly into one of the seven standard main menus.

9.2 Command Shell

This menu choice enables the user to invoke commands and run external programs without exiting MicroMODEL. This program is simply a command shell. The user enters as many commands as desired. Type "EXIT" at the command prompt to return to MicroMODEL.

9.3 Move Grid Files from One Setup to Another

This menu choice runs the program that allows the user to move grid files (block models) from one project information setup to another. This program is used in cases where the user must either expand or contract the size of a project area. The two project models must have common offset boundaries for columns, rows, and levels. In other words, one model must be offset from the other model in an exact multiple of column width, row width, and level width. A zero offset in one or more directions is acceptable.

The program will move topography grids (including cone surfaces), grade grids, and rock model grids. The program is run from the new project directory, that is, the one where the grid file is being moved to. The user specifies the directory (path) to the original project, original file name, and new file name. The user must also specify an initial value that will be written into the new file before the original grid information is transferred.

This program will work with rotated models, but the user must be sure that the new origin and old origin are separated by an even multiple of row dimension and column dimension in the rotated local model coordinates.

Prior to running this program, the user should be sure that the following items have been addressed:

The user should carefully check the new model against the old to be sure that the correct offsets have been applied by this program. It is suggested that plan view cell plots of the old and new models, with global grid, be created. These can be overlayed on a light table.

9.4 Calculate Reserves Based on Matrix

This tools allows the user to calculate reserves by category of material, based on a matrix of rock codes and cutoff grade ranges, from one or more OPD.TON compatible files. Both the Open Pit Design program (OPD), and the Cone Reserve program create a file, OPD.TON, that contains reserve information by level, by rock, and by cutoff for that particular run. This file can be copied to another file. For example, after running cone reserves for cone number 3, the user can use the following command to save the cone 3 reserve information:

COPY OPD.TON CONE003.TON

The user may also use the file prefix feature for the cone reserve program or OPD reserve program to create a copy of the OPD.TON file directly.

This program will analyze the contents of one or more of these files and report reserves by categories of material, based on a matrix of rock codes and cutoff grade ranges.

There are several differences between this reserve calculation program and the standard programs within MicroMODEL. First, reserves can be reported for a combination of OPD.TON files, instead of just one OPD.TON file. Second, the cutoff for ore and waste categories is varied for each rock type, so that the user has more control over the way cutoff values are applied.

To calculate reserves with this program, the user selects choice number 4 from the Special Tools Menu.

The user selects the appropriate OPD answerset to use.

Then, as with most MicroMODEL programs, the user chooses the answerset number for this run and the title.

Next, the user enters the NUMBER OF CATEGORIES ( i.e., leach, mill, run-of-mine) to report. This is the number of categories in addition to category WASTE. Note the WASTE is always considered a category, so to report ORE and WASTE, answer 1 to this question.

For each CATEGORY, the user enters the NAME OF THE CATEGORY. This name appears at the top of the tons/grade column in the program output.

For each CATEGORY, the user also must indicate whether material in that category will be considered as ore for the waste:ore ratio calculation. This allows flexibility so that, for example, if category "HEAP LEACH" is considered as waste in the waste:ore calculation, then the user can choose the appropriate action.

Finally, for each category, the user must select the LABEL TO REPORT in the particular column of output. Category selection is always based on the primary label to report from OPD. However, the user can report any of the other labels designated in the pit generation answers.

Next, the user must choose either a SUMMARY ONLY, or the full output. Summary Only selects bench-by-bench totals with a grand total. Full output gives, in addition to the summary only output, a cumulative summary by bench starting from the top bench and going downwards.

If necessary, the user can choose to COMBINE BENCHES in the output. For example, to schedule a large pit in 40-foot bench increments on a model with 10 foot benches, the user could combine the output of every 4 benches.

The user enters the NUMBER OF OPD files to report. The name of each OPD file is then entered.

Finally, the user must define the CATEGORY MATRIX. For combination of rock type and primary cutoff grade interval, the user must designate the category number for which this material will be included. For example, rock type number 4 between cutoff grade number 2 and cutoff grade number 3 might be designated as category number 2.

As an example, suppose that it is necessary to report "LEACH ORE" for two different rock types. Rock type number 1 is oxide and has a higher recovery than rock type number 2, which is sulfide. Consequently, rock type number 1 has a higher percent recovery for heap leach and can be selected at a lower cutoff than rock type number 2.

The LEACH ORE cutoff for rock type number 1 is 0.015 Au, while the LEACH ORE cutoff for rock type number 2 is 0.027 Au. For this scenario, the user has selected two cutoffs in the pit generation parameters: 0.015 and 0.027. To report the grade and ton of LEACH ORE, along with Waste tons, the user would designate one category, called "LEACH ORE", and define the cutoff matrix as follows.

For all rock types, the material between 0.0 and the first designated cutoff is always designated as 0 (WASTE). Consequently, for rock type 1, the material between 0 and 0.015 is category number 0 (WASTE). The material between 0.015 and 0.027 is category number 1 (LEACH ORE). The material above 0.027 is also number 1 (LEACH ORE).

For rock type 2, the material between 0 and 0.015 is category number 0 (WASTE). The material between 0.015 and 0.027 is also category number 0 (WASTE). The material above 0.027 is category number 1 (LEACH ORE).

The this example, we would generate the following category matrix:

Category Matrix
Rock Code 0.015 <= Au < 0.027 0.027 < Au
1 (Oxide) 1 (LEACH ORE) 1 (LEACH ORE)
2 (Sulfide) 0 (WASTE) 1 (LEACH ORE)

9.5 Adjust Rock Model Values for New Topography

This program can be used to "update" the zero value (air blocks) in the MicroMODEL 3-D rock file, R200, if the topography grid file has been changed. A common situation where this program might be used is for an actual operation, where a pit has been partially mined out, and the original (pre-mining) rock model does not reflect the current surface topography.

Another situation where the program is useful is when a rock model has been imported from another modeling system, and contains background codes in "air" blocks, instead of the standard zero values that MicroMODEL expects.

This program will also "fill-in" zero rock code blocks with the highest non-zero block in a vertical stack of rock model blocks, if the topography grid has for some reason been recalculated to be higher than the original location for a particular row and column.

To run the program, the user selects the appropriate menu choice. The user then confirms that this is the program he wishes to run.

9.6 Count Rock Codes in Blocks, Samples, or Composites

This program tallies up the number of different rock codes that are in either the 3-D rock model, the sample interval file, or the composite file. For each rock type, the total number of occurrences is reported, along with the row, column, and level limits in which that rock type occurs. Note that the block range limits are reported not only for the 3-D block model report, but for the sample interval or composite file report as well.

9.7 Create Rock Interval Information Coding File

This program creates a file that contains rock interval information from either the sample data file or the composite data file. The output from this program is in the correct format for use with the next menu choice, "Update Rock Interval Information Based on Coding File."

By using this program and the next menu choice, the user can more easily make changes to the drillhole rock interval codes.

9.8 Update Rock Interval Information Based on Coding File

This program allows the user to update either the sample interval file, or the composite file, with new rock coding information. The rock codes are updated based on information stored in an ASCII input file that is in the same format as the file created by running the previous menu choice, "Create Rock Interval Information Coding File."

The user can either update the rock label, or one of the assay labels can be updated with the rock information.

The format of the ASCII input file is as follows:

    Name of Drillhole

    from, to, rock code
    ... repeat for each interval
    * * * END OF HOLE * * *

    ... Repeat for each hole.

The from-to intervals in this file do not have to match sample or composite intervals, although normally, the interval breaks would correspond to breaks in the sample interval file. From, to, and rock code are entered in free format. The can be separated either by commas or by spaces.

9.9 Assign Reserve Classification Based on Triangulation

This program uses an algorithm which, based on distances between holes in a triangulation network and a set of distance criteria based on geologic continuity, assigns numeric codes representing proven, probable, and possible reserve classification status.

The numeric codes are assigned to each block in a standard MicroMODEL 3-D grade file. The codes can then be used, in conjunction with the rock model and grade models, to report reserves for each classification.

The validity of the classifications calculated by this program depends entirely on the validity of the distance criteria that are specified. These distances are assigned based on a variety of factors including, but not limited to, geologic complexity, type of deposit, variography, and knowledge of similar deposits.

The program works on a level by level basis, and works only on bench composites. Grade limits can be placed on the composites, if desired, to assign classifications using only composites within a certain range of values. Normally, grade limits are not imposed. Unsampled composites are never used in the classification process.

For each block on the level, the program finds all (non-unsampled) composites within relevant distance and examines the triangles that are formed by connecting each possible triplet of composites. Then, one by one, each block on that level is compared to the triangles. Classification is performed according to a logical set of rules, based on two sets of distance criteria: interpolation limits and extrapolation limits.

For each classification (proven, probable, and possible), there is an interpolation distance limit and an extrapolation distance limit. By definition, the limits must increase as the classification goes from proven to probable to possible. An example set of distances might be as follows:

Example Distances
Classification Interpolation Limit Extrapolation Limit
PROVEN 100 FEET 25 FEET
PROBABLE 150 FEET 40 FEET
POSSIBLE 175 FEET 50 FEET

Rules for classification are as follows:

  1. If all sides of a triangle are less than or equal to the interpolation limit for proven material, then all blocks with centers that fall within that triangle are considered proven (refer to figure 9-1). In addition:
  2.              FIGURE 9.1
     PROVEN/PROBABLE/POSSIBLE CLASSIFICATION
     Side A <= Proven Interpolation Limit
     Side B <= Proven Interpolation Limit
     Side C <= Proven Interpolation Limit
     Radius x = Proven Extrapolation Limit
     Radius y = Probable Extrapolation Limit
     Radius z = Possible Extrapolation Limit
    
  3. If at least one side of a triangle is greater than the proven interpolation limit, but all sides of a triangle are less than or equal to the interpolation limit for probable material, then all blocks with centers that fall within that triangle are considered probable (refer to figure 9-2). In addition:
  4.              FIGURE 9.2
     PROVEN/PROBABLE/POSSIBLE CLASSIFICATION
     Side A  > Proven Interpolation Limit
     Side A <= Probable Interpolation Limit
     Side B < Side C < Side A
     Radius x = Proven Extrapolation Limit
     Radius y = Probable Extrapolation Limit
     Radius z = Possible Extrapolation Limit
    
  5. If at least one side of a triangle is greater than the probable interpolation limit, but all sides of a triangle are less than or equal to the interpolation limit for possible material, then all blocks with centers that fall within that triangle are considered possible (refer to figure 9-3). In addition:
  6.              FIGURE 9.3
     PROVEN/PROBABLE/POSSIBLE CLASSIFICATION
     Side A  > Probable Interpolation Limit
     Side A <= Possible Interpolation Limit
     Side B < Side C < Side A
     Radius x = Proven Extrapolation Limit
     Radius y = Probable Extrapolation Limit
     Radius z = Possible Extrapolation Limit
    
  7. If at least one side of a triangle is greater than the possible interpolation limit, then (refer to figure 1-4):
  8.              FIGURE 9.4
     PROVEN/PROBABLE/POSSIBLE CLASSIFICATION
     Side A  > Possible Interpolation Limit
     Side B < Side C < Side A
     Radius x = Proven Extrapolation Limit
     Radius y = Probable Extrapolation Limit
     Radius z = Possible Extrapolation Limit
    
  9. If a triangle cannot be formed, that is, if only one or two composites are within the search area, then (refer to figure 9-5):
  10.              FIGURE 9.5
     PROVEN/PROBABLE/POSSIBLE CLASSIFICATION
     Length of Side A Does not Matter
     Radius x = Proven Extrapolation Limit
     Radius y = Probable Extrapolation Limit
     Radius z = Possible Extrapolation Limit
    

Each block is assigned the "best" classification possible, based on the limits and on the composite locations. If one triangle would cause a block to be assigned as possible, but another triangle would cause a block to be assigned as proven, then the block classification will be proven.

Results are written to a specified 3-D grade model file, which is defined by the label number and model type.

Codes written to the file are:

9.10 Calculate Dump Volume from Digitized Contours

This program calculates a waste dump volume, based on a set of digitized contours, and a starting surface grid. The resulting waste dump surface can be stored in another surface grid.

The user enters the ANSWERSET NAME, and specifies the source of the digitized contours. The STARTING TOPOGRAPHY CONE SURFACE number and the ENDING TOPOGRAPHY CONE SURFACE NUMBER must be entered. Normally, the starting topography cone surface number is zero (original topography). However, it is possible that another starting surface might be used. One situation where this is true is for backfilling a pit.

The ending topography cone surface number can be any value the user wants between 1 and 99. This surface can then be displayed as a contour map, or used as a starting surface for subsequent waste dump designs.

The source of the digitized data file must be selected. The default is from ASCII file POLY.PIT. The user may elect to choose a different ASCII file by pressing the "Access *.CNT Files" button. This will bring up a standard file selection dialog. If the user wishes to access digitized data directly from a PolyMap map, then the "Access PolyMap" button is pressed, and the user selects the PolyMap directory and then selects the individual map name to use.

9.11 Check Drillhole Collars Against Topo Grid

This tool choice runs a program that compares the collar elevation of each drillhole that has been entered into MicroMODEL against elevation of the drillhole as estimated from the current surface topography grid. Note that if the topo grid has been created by using drillhole collar elevations as part of the input data, then testing collar elevations with this tool is moot. Use this checker to verify that drillhole collars coordinates have been correctly entered.

9.12 Create X-Y-Z Data File from Seam Outcrop Locations

This tool choice runs a program that will create an XYZ data file suitable for use by the "Prepare Surface or Thickness Data" program. The user enters the name of a digitized polygon file, and the program calculates the elevation for each digitzed X-Y point based on the modeled surface topo file (T200).

9.13 Plot Downhole Intercept Locations

This tool choice runs a program that will plot the location of a drillhole at a given depth as specified by the user. A simple text file must be created which includes a run title on the first line, followed by one or more data lines. Each data line contains the drillhole name and the depth to plot. The data line must be formatted such that the first 12 characters in the line contain the drillhole name, left justified, followed by the depth down hole to display. Only one intercept per hole is allowed. Any subsequent entries for the same hole in the text file are ignored.

This tool was written to help manually contour the location of faults, but may be used for other purposes. The user can display the drillhole name, northing, easting, elevation, rock, and pick depth.