13.0 FILE NOMENCLATURE

13.1 Introduction

Subheadings for this chapter are as follows:

  1. Introduction
  2. Batch Files
  3. Data Files
  4. Database Files
  5. Polygon Files
  6. Plot Files
  7. Print Files
  8. Response Files
  9. System Management Files
  10. Temporary Files

The file organization tables serve as reference for advanced users who need more information on MicroMODEL's program sequence and input/output files. The table numbers correspond to the module and submodule sequence.

In the file organization tables, programs are highlighted with bold printing. The first time a file name is encountered, the type and format of the file is listed in parenthesis (ty fm) according to the following codes:

Type of File (ty)

File Format (fm)

A basic description of these nine file types and file nomenclature follows.

13.2 Batch Files (ba as)

Batch files contain commands which manipulate and execute the MicroMODEL files and programs. Batch files are named by their function and always have .BAT as an extension. For example, PROG.BAT sequences all program execution and file management within the menu system and PLOT.BAT controls all plotted output.

13.3 Data Files (da as)

Data files are existing ASCII files created outside of MicroMODEL to be used as drill hole data input.

13.4 Database Files

Database files contain drill hole data, surface models, rock models, grade models, and other types of information created by MicroMODEL. None of these files have an extension. They are named with from four to seven characters. For surface, rock, grade, and seam models, the first character is a letter denoting the type of information contained in the file. This character is assigned according to the following guide:

13.4.1 Sample Drill Hole Database Files

The sample drill hole database files have the following names, and contain the described information:

13.4.2 Surface Model Files (T files)

There are a total of 100 allowable surface models within MicroMODEL. The original surface model file is called T200. The remaining 99 files are called T201 through T299. These files normally contain surfaces created with the floating cone program. However, they may also contain converted mined out OPD pits, or waste dump designs.

Each surface file is organized as a FORTRAN unformatted, direct access file, with a fixed record length equal to the number of columns in the given model, multiplied by 4 bytes. Each 4 byte word in the record represents a column elevation value. The records are in row order, starting with row 1, and ending at the number of rows in the model.

13.4.3 Thickness Model Files (W files)

There are a total of 99 allowable thickness models within MicroMODEL. These files are called W201 through W299. These files normally contain thicknesses generated with 2-D modeling, however, they may also contain values generated with the surface/thickness manipulation.

Each thickness file is organized as a FORTRAN unformatted, direct access file, with a fixed record length equal to the number of columns in the given model, multiplied by 4 bytes. Each 4 byte word in the record represents a column elevation value. The records are in row order, starting with row 1, and ending at the number of rows in the model.

13.4.4 Rock Model Files (R Files)

There are two rock model files used by MicroMODEL. The permanent rock model file is called R200. During pit generation, the "mining" of blocks is performed on a temporary copy of R200, called R300. See Volume I, Section 4.6 for further discussion of this procedure.

The rock model file is organized as a FORTRAN unformatted, direct access file, with a fixed record length equal to the number of columns in the given model, multiplied by 4 bytes. Each 4 byte word in the record represents a column value. The records are in row order, starting with row 1 level1, continuing to row N level1, to row1 level 2, etc., and ending at row N level N, which is the last record in the file.

13.4.5 Composited Drill Hole Database Files

The composited drill hole database files have the following names, and contain the described information:

13.4.6 Grade Modeling Files (G Files)

Files created during grade modeling (Module 5) are classified by modeling method. The second character designates modeling method according to the following rules:

Money matrix models, created with the Cone Miner/Money Matrix module (Module 6), are also stored in the Kriged grade values slot. The money matrix values are not actually kriged, but the values are always stored in the kriged model slot by convention.

The third and fourth characters of a grade modeling database file name refer to the MicroMODEL grade label number. Examples of grade model file names, where grade label 1 is Gold, grade label 2 is Silver, and grade label 3 is the money matrix are:

The grade model files are organized exactly the same as the rock model files. Refer to Section 13.4.3 for details.

13.4.7 Top of Seam Files (S files)

There are a total of 999 allowable top of seam models within MicroMODEL. These files are called S0001 through S0999. Each of these files contains the as-modeled topopgraphy elevations for the given seam.

13.4.8 Adjusted Top of Seam Files (A files)

There are a total of 999 allowable adjusted top of seam models within MicroMODEL. These files are called A0001 through A0999. Each of these files contains the as-modeled topopgraphy, adjusted for subcrops. The adjusted seam models are what is used for calculating reserves, plotting quality models, etc.

13.4.9 Seam Quality Files (Q files)

For each seam, one or more quality models can be produced. These quality models named in a similar fashion to 3-D grade models, except that the name also includes the seam number.

Files created during Quality modeling (Module 5) are classified by modeling method. The second character designates modeling method according to the following rules:

The third and fourth characters of a quality modeling database file name refer to the MicroMODEL quality label number. Examples of grade model file names, where grade label 1 is BTU, grade label 2 is %Ash are:

The fifth through eighth characters of a quality modeling database file name refer to the seam number. Examples of quality model file names, where quality label 1 is BTU, grade label 2 is %Ash are:

13.5 Polygon Files (pg as)

Polygon files contain digitized points created by the program DIGIT, for use as input to various modeling programs. The polygon files used in MicroMODEL

include:

POLY.CNT contains one or more blocks of same elevation topography data. Each block begins with a header line containing the elevation, two dummy values (0), and the number of points (NPTS) to follow. Following the header, there are NPTS lines containing the Easting and Northing of the digitized elevation. The file is read in using free format. Closure is NOT assumed for each feature. An example of a POLY.CNT file which contains two elevation lines, one at 3100 feet and one at 3200 feet is shown below:

  3100.0  0  0     8
       5226.938       4348.061
       5231.090       4356.090
       5232.623       4362.500
       5229.066       4370.934
       5226.289       4376.289
       5222.917       4387.500
       5222.161       4397.161
       5222.708       4402.292
  3200.0  0  0     6
       3937.052       5987.500
       3949.809       5974.809
       3962.500       5959.490
       3972.899       5947.899
       3984.056       5934.056
       3997.604       5912.500

POLY.RKP contains one or more blocks of plan view rock boundary polygons. Each block begins with a header line containing the starting elevation, ending elevation, rock code, and the number of points (NPTS) to follow. Following the header, there are NPTS lines containing the Easting and Northing of the digitized elevation. The file is read in using free format. Closure IS assumed for each feature. Any bench whose midpoint elevation is within range of the starting to ending elevation is affected by the polygon. An example of a POLY.RKP file which contains two rock polygons is shown below. The first polygon defines a rock code 5 outline from 3190 to 3205 feet. The second defines a rock code 10 boundary from 3210 to 3225 feet.

     3190.000000     3205.000000           5          25
     4545.21     5203.81
     4547.47     5213.96
     4550.29     5225.23
     4558.74     5236.50
     4588.05     5243.83
     4599.32     5244.39
     4611.72     5243.83
     4630.88     5241.01
     4642.15     5235.37
     4648.92     5222.97
     4652.86     5208.88
     4652.86     5195.92
     4652.30     5182.39
     4649.48     5173.38
     4646.66     5167.74
     4641.59     5159.85
     4626.37     5155.34
     4612.28     5153.65
     4598.76     5154.21
     4588.05     5155.34
     4581.29     5158.72
     4566.63     5166.61
     4554.23     5176.19
     4545.78     5189.72
     4545.21     5203.81
     3210.000000     3225.000000           10          10
     4690.04     4977.98
     4694.81     4979.52
     4700.04     4980.14
     4704.35     4980.14
     4709.27     4979.52
     4713.12     4978.29
     4712.20     4977.83
     4700.04     4977.06
     4693.74     4977.06
     4690.04     4977.98

POLY.RKS contains one or more blocks of section view rock boundary polygons. Each block begins with a header line containing the +/- influence distance, dummy value (0), rock code, and the number of points (NPTS) to follow. Following the header, there are NPTS lines containing the Easting, Northing, and elevation the digitized rock boundary. Note that the X-Y-Z points must be co-planar. The file is read in using free format. Closure IS assumed for each feature. An example of a POLY.RKS file which contains a rock polygon for a North-South section is shown below. The polygon defines a rock code 7 outline.

       50.000000 0           7          31
    4500.000000    4696.652000    3542.938000
    4500.000000    4720.089000    3546.010000
    4500.000000    4749.345000    3548.010000
    4500.000000    4766.233000    3548.010000
    4500.000000    4790.175000    3544.010000
    4500.000000    4865.807000    3518.010000
    4500.000000    4915.655000    3502.010000
    4500.000000    5008.574000    3454.010000
    4500.000000    5065.575000    3423.972000
    4500.000000    5065.461000    3423.755000
    4500.000000    5037.533000    3374.559000
    4500.000000    5031.934000    3352.164000
    4500.000000    5054.329000    3330.888000
    4500.000000    5119.274000    3293.937000
    4500.000000    5143.908000    3278.260000
    4500.000000    5188.698000    3265.943000
    4500.000000    5233.488000    3249.146000
    4500.000000    5262.602000    3242.428000
    4500.000000    5298.433000    3230.111000
    4500.000000    5250.284000    3206.596000
    4500.000000    5186.458000    3231.230000
    4500.000000    5134.950000    3262.583000
    4500.000000    5115.915000    3278.260000
    4500.000000    5018.497000    3329.769000
    4500.000000    4980.426000    3352.164000
    4500.000000    4960.270000    3357.762000
    4500.000000    4938.995000    3366.720000
    4500.000000    4917.720000    3372.319000
    4500.000000    4860.613000    3396.954000
    4500.000000    4813.583000    3423.828000
    4500.000000    4759.836000    3477.576000

POLY.PIT contains one or more blocks of same elevation pit design data. Each block begins with a header line containing the bench, two dummy values (0), and the number of points (NPTS) to follow. Following the header, there are NPTS lines containing the Easting and Northing of the digitized elevation. The file is read in using free format. Closure IS assumed for each feature. An elevation falling anywhere from the bench toe to just less than the bench crest is assumed to belong to that bench. POLY.PIT files look exactly like POLY.CNT files.

In addition, there are several polygon boundary files that may be utilized by some of the floating cone programs. Suggested names for these files are:

The user should refer to Volume II, sections 6.11.3.4, 6.11.4, and 6.11.5, for details.

13.6 Plot Files (pl as)

Plot files contain data and plotter commands to produce plots. These files are named after the programs that create them, with .PLT for the plot command file and .SCL for the plot scale factor as extensions. Some examples are:

    Program                         Plot File(s)

CFREQ (Cumulative Frequency) CFREQ.PLT, CFREQ.SCL CELL (Plan View Cell Plot) CELL.PLT, CELL.SCL SECT(Drill Hole Cross Section) SECT.PLT, SECT.SCL Note: Plot files are deleted by the directory clean-up options in each module.

13.7 Print Files (pr as)

Print files contain ASCII data to be printed on a printer. These files are named similarly to the programs that create them or the type of data they contain, with .PRN as an extension. Some examples of MicroMODEL print files follow:

    Program                   Print File

    STATS (histogram)         HISTOUT.PRN
    PRDATA (drill hole data)  SAMPLE.PRN
    PRNPLT (printer plot)     PRNPLT.PRN
    OPD (detailed output)     OPDDET.PRN

    Note:

    Print files are deleted by the directory clean-up
    options in each module.

13.8 Response Files (re bn)

Response files contain the responses for all programs that require input from the user. These files are also called answer files. The response files are named similarly to the programs and/or database grid types that use them.

In general, response files are named after the database file name with the program name as an extension. This allows each database to have a unique response file. Main programs use response files named after themselves with .ANS as an extension. Typical MicroMODEL program and response file name relationships are:

    Program         Response File

    CONTIN (topo)   T200.CON
    CONT            CONT.ANS
    CONTIN (grade)  G302.CON
    CONT            CONT.ANS

13.9 System Management File (sm as)

The system management file, SUBMENU.DAT, contains the current menu location within MicroMODEL to ensure that the correct database files are accessed by the various multi-module programs.

13.10 Temporary Files (tp bn)

Temporary files are used as input to subsequent programs when altering the original data would be undesirable. Typically, temporary files are used in the sorting and modeling programs. Temporary files often have .TMP as an extension.

Note: Temporary files are deleted by the directory clean-up options in each module.