3.0 PolyMap DISPLAY MAPS

This module enables the user to display or plot raw data, updated polygons, or filled polygons. Programs that create or edit various input files that are needed by these display programs are also included in this module. The Display Maps choices appear below:

  1. Command Shell
  2. Plot Raw Geology, Pit Designs, or Topo Maps
  3. Create Label Exclusion File
  4. Create Pen Color Definition File
  5. Plot Updated Geology
  6. Create Intercept Control File
  7. Create Piercepoint Plot Control File
  8. Create Shading Control File
  9. Display Filled Polygons to Screen
  10. Create Polygon Fill Control File

3.0.1 Introduction to Map Display

For topography and pit maps, there is only one program that can be used to display maps: Plot Raw Geology or Topo Maps. For geologic data, there are three different forms that the data can be in and, consequently, there are three choices for displaying geologic data.

The program to plot raw geology or topo maps is used to display the raw digitized geology data. The program to plot updated geology is used to plot the updated line segments that are labelled left and right with the area name that exists on each side of the segment. Polygon fill displays of the updated geology are made with the display filled polygons to screen program.

3.1 Command Shell

This menu choice enables the user to invoke commands and run external programs without exiting PolyMap. Refer to section 1.1 for details.

3.2 Plot Raw Geology or Topo Maps

This menu choice allows the user to display plots of either digitized geology or digitized topography.

This program can be used to display the contents of any PolyMap raw data file. Selections for display are made on the basis of location, layer, and any special controls the user chooses to implement.

After starting the program, the user is first required to select the appropriate answer set. Then, the first input screen is presented which includes map choice, grid option, plot extent, and color choices.

The first input field is for the answer set name. The map to display is chosen from a drop down menu. Both local and global grids can be plotted for plan view maps. The user should refer to MicroMODEL documentation for information on local and global grids.

For plan view maps, the plot limits are set by selecting starting and ending rows and columns to display. For sections, the left and right edge coordinates are entered, as well as the top and bottom elevation.

The second screen contains input information for controlling display colors and labeling. The user should refer to the program help for more information.

The final input screen is for entering miscellaneous plotting parameters, including elevation line options for section plots.

3.3 Create Label Exclusion File

This option allows the user to create or edit a label exclusion file which can be used in conjunction with the raw data plotting program (sections 3.3 and 3.4). The label exclusion file is required when the user wants to exclude certain traces from having their labelling controlled by the label control map.

3.3.1 Label Control Map

The label control map is a separate map that is used in conjunction with the raw data display program. The label control map is an entirely separate map from the map that is actually being plotted. It must be created using PolyMap interactive pit digitizing program. This label control feature was specifically designed for use in displaying pit maps and topography maps.

Two types of labelling are possible; in-line and below line. In-line labelling is generally used for topographic contours, while below line labelling is normally used on pit access roads and ramps.

The labelling control map consists of one or more traces that are digitized so that, if the traces are overlaid onto the map being plotted, the traces will intersect one or more of the contour lines on that map.

The way in which each labelling control trace interacts with the map being plotted is governed by the name assigned to the labelling control trace. Two separate items of information are placed within the name of the control trace. These items are encoded as follows:

      Character 1 = labeling type code
                1 = in-line labeling
                2 = downhill labeling
   Characters 5-8 = optional labeling interval

Examples of different label names, and the type of labelling they would create, are shown below:

                      12345678 
         Example 1:   2


      This label name would create downhill labels for each
      contour on the original map that this label control trace
      intercepts.


                      12345678 
         Example 2:   1    100


      This label name would create in-line labels for each
      contour on the original map that this label control trace
      intercepts, but only if that contour is evenly divisible by
      100.

Note that there is a choice in the pulldown Polyline menu that allows the user to set the labeling parameters. Select "Set Polyline Name for Label Control" and enter your choice from the dialog box provided.

If the trace name on the map being plotted matches one of the names in the label exclusion file, then that particular trace will not be labelled, even though a label control line intersects with that trace.

It is always assumed that the traces being labelled by the label control file have been digitized or created following the convention that the trace runs in a direction with downhill to the right.

In-line labels begin at the point of intersection between the label control trace and the contour and are plotted from there towards the end of the contour. Downhill labels are centered at the intersection point and are plotted on the downhill side of the contour.

3.3.2 Label Exclusion File

An exclusion file is created to prohibit labelling of traces that would otherwise be labelled according to the label control file. In addition, this file can cause excluded traces to be plotted as dashed lines, with the dash pattern being controlled by several sets of parameters included in this file.

The exclusion file is normally used to control the plotting of waste dump outlines, roads, cut/fill lines, building locations, etc. These type of lines do not normally require a label, but might need to be plotted as dashed lines. The pen number (color) used when plotting these excluded traces is still governed by the pen control file.

After selecting the choice to create or edit a label exclusion file, the user is required to select the appropriate answer set. The user is then presented with a single input screen.

The first input field is for the answer set name. The user enters the name of the label exclusion file in the bottom input field. The number of different trace types to exclude is entered in the second input field. Up to one hundred different trace types can be defined.

For each trace type, the user enters the name of the trace to exclude. The remaining four fields for each trace are for optionally changing the line drawn for the excluded trace from a solid line to a dashed pattern. For solid lines, all four fields are set to 0.0 units. For simple dash patterns, the user enters one dash length in the column labeled "Dash-1", and one space length in the column labeled "Space-1."

For more a more complex, alternating, dash pattern, the user enters a second dash length in the column labelled "Dash-2", and a second space length in the column labeled "Space-2."

For example if the four dash control fields for a given trace are entered as 50, 10, 25, 10, then that trace will be plotted with a dash pattern that consists of alternating 50 unit and 25 unit dash lengths, separated by 10 units between each of the dashes.

The user may look at, or even modify, the label exclusion file that is created with this program. The file is a plain text (ASCII) file. However, the user is warned that the program that creates the file reads and writes the answers to a binary answer file. Any changes made to the ASCII output file with an editing program will be superseded if the standard PolyMap program to create or edit the file is re-run.

3.4 Create Pen Color Definition File

A pen color control file allows the user to explicitly control the color of each trace type that is displayed. If the user does not include a trace type in this file, then any traces of that type will not be displayed.

After selecting this choice, the user must select the appropriate answer set. The user is then presented with the first input screen which consists of three input fields. The first input field is for the answer set name. The number of different trace types for which to define pen colors is entered in the second input field. Pen colors can be defined for up to five hundred different trace types. The user enters the name of the pen color control file in the final input field. The Access Directory Button can be used to browse the computer directory.

Subsequent input screens contain one pair of input fields for each of the total number of traces that was specified in the first input screen. For each trace, the user enters the trace name in the left hand input field, and picks the color with the right hand color button.

Finally, the user elects to either continue with the run, or quit. If continue is selected, the pen color control file is written. If quit is selected, the program is exited without changes.

3.5 Plot Updated Geology

This option is used to display the contents of any updated PolyMap file. Selections for display are made on the basis of location and layer.

After starting this program, the user is asked to select the appropriate answer set. Following this, the user is presented with the first input screen.

The first input field is for entering the answer set name. The map to display is chosen using the pull down menu. Plot limits are controlled by row and column numbers for plan view plots. For sections, the plot limits are defined by the section edge coordinates and the bottom and top elevation. Local and global grids can be plotted for plan view maps. Various pen colors are selected on this screen.

The second input screen controls how the polylines will be displayed.

In the second grouping, the user specifies which include set (see section 1.6) of maps will have their intercepts drawn via a drop down menu. Intercepts for maps defined by this include set will be drawn onto the map displayed by this program. If zero (0) is selected, then no intercepts will be drawn. If a non-zero value for include set is entered, then the user must enter the name of the intercept control file (see section 3-10) in the second input field for this group.

In the Use Pierce Point Plot file group box is a check box that should be selected if a pierce point plotting control file will be used (see section 3.11). If selected, then the user must enter the name of the pierce point plotting control file. The adjacent Access Directory button can be used to browse the computer directory.

In the Use Shading Control group box is a check box that should be selected if a shading control file will be used (see section 3.12). If selected, then the user must enter the name of the shading control file. The adjacent Access Directory button can be used to browse the computer directory.

The color buttons in the Pen Colors for Control by Layer group box control the pen number (color) to use for traces belonging to each of the layers that have been defined for the PolyMap project. To suppress the display of a layer, select the 0 (do not plot) color.

In the third input screen, the character size for plotting traces and for plotting grid labels are entered. Also, if the map being displayed is a section map, then parameters for controlling the display of elevation grid lines are entered.

The user selects RUN to run the program, EDIT to change input, or QUIT to quit the program. Following this, the user is prompted for title block information. Refer to MicroMODEL documentation for instructions on title block display.

If the user elects to continue with the program run, then a plot file is created, and the user can then preview the plot on screen. The plot can also be output in HP750C plotter format, or to AutoCAD DXF format.

3.6 Create Intercept Plotting Control File

This choice allows the user to create or edit an intercept plotting control file, which is used in conjunction with the program that displays updated geology. This file defines the type of bar-shaped pattern that is used to indicate intersection points of areas from one map onto another. Five parameters affect the appearance of the bar pattern:

  1. Pen color as determined by the pen number selected.
  2. A check box selects whether tic marks or full rectangles will be displayed.
  3. Bar width is specified in feet/meters between the two parallel sides of the rectangle.
  4. Lettering height defines the height infeet/meters of the area label. A height of zero (0.0) inches suppresses the labelling.
  5. Lettering angle determines the angle as measured from the bar direction at which the area label is plotted. An angle of 90 degrees causes the label to plot perpendicular to the sides of the bar.
  6. Centered symbol number to plot at each end of the bar. Choices are selected from a drop down menu.

When this program is selected, the user must first select the appropriate answer set response. Next, the user is presented with the first input screen, which consists of two input fields. The first input field is for entering the answer set name. The second input field is for entering the name of the intercept plotting control file. The Access Directory button can be used to browse the computer directories.

Subsequent input screens contain a line of information input for every area currently defined in the project. First, the color for plotting the area is selected. A choice of 0 (do not plot) is selected to suppress plotting of intercepts for this area. A check box can be checked to plot intercepts as simple tic marks. Otherwise, the intercepts are plotted as colored rectangles.

The bar width for each rectangle is entered in feet/meters, as is the character size for label plotting. Finally, the centered symbol is chosen from a drop down menu.

After defining the intercept information, the user can elect to continue, in which case the program inputs are written to the intercept control file. The user may also elect to quit the program, in which case all input is ignored.

3.7 Create Piercepoint Plotting Control File

This option allows the user to create a piercepoint plotting control file that is used by the program that plots updated geology. This file defines which trace labels will plot on an intercept map if that trace type pierces the map. This option should be used when it is important to know the type of trace boundary that divides two areas on a map. This option must be used if the location of a fault is to be displayed and that fault is between two areas of the same type. Boundaries of this type are considered redundant by the intercept plotting routine, and they do not show up on an intercept plot.

To display, each line type must be selected within the pierce point plotting control file. For each line type, a pen number, lettering height, centered symbol number and angle are specified. Each line in the control file contains the following information:

  1. Trace Label - Label of the trace to display pierce point for.
  2. Pen Number - Pen number (color) to use.
  3. Lettering Height - Height of label plotted.
  4. Centered Symbol.
  5. Labeling Angle - Angle of label measured from horizontal.

After selecting this program, the user makes the appropriate answer set choice. Next, the user is presented with the first input screen, which consists of two input fields. The first input field is for entering the answer set name. The second input field is for entering the name of the pierce point plotting control file. The Access Directory button can be used to browse the computer directory.

Subsequent input screens contain a line of input for each trace type defined in the project. To suppress the plotting of a particular line time, select color 0 (do not plot). The Character size of the label is entered in feet/meters. The centered symbol to plot is selected from a pull down menu. The at which to plot the label is entered in the last input field on each line.

After defining the piercepoint information, the user can elect to continue, in which case the program inputs are written to the piercepoint plotting control file. The user may also elect to quit the program, in which case all input is ignored.

3.8 Create Shading Control File

This option allows the user to create or edit a shading control file, which is used in conjunction with the program to plot updated geology. This file controls how combinations of areas are shaded, and contains one or more sets of area combinations and color patterns. An area combination can be as simple as a single area type within one layer, or as complex as the combination of one or more areas on a layer with one or more areas on other layers. Two rules govern the way area combinations are defined:

  1. Combinations of more than one area type within a single layer are treated as a single combined area. For example, if areas A and B are included from a layer, the area combination consists of a single combined area of A and B.
  2. If area types from more than one layer are specified, the area combination will consists of those spots where all the individual layer combinations exist at the same time. The most simple example would be an area combination defined by a single area from one layer and a single area from another layer. For example, the combination of area A from layer 1 and area X from layer 2 would consist of any spot where both A and X exist at the same time.

Each area combination in the shading control file can contain one to three color patterns. A color pattern defines the angle at which shade lines are plotted, the spacing between lines, the pen color used, and the starting point of the first line. These four factors are defined as follows:

  1. Plot angle - The angle at which the shading lines are plotted, measured counterclockwise from positive X axis of map. A negative angle is measured clockwise. For example:
    1. 0.0 degrees = horizontal lines
    2. 90.0 degrees = vertical lines
    3. 45.0 degrees = lines running from lower left to upper right
    4. 35.0 degrees = lines running from upper left to lower right.
  2. Line spacing - The spacing between shade lines in inches. Note: if the "Check for Rectangle Fill" box is checked, then this is the width of filled rectangles that will be displayed.
  3. Pen Color - The pen color to use.
  4. Starting point for first shading line - A decimal fraction greater than 0 and less than 1 unit. The first line starts at a distance that is the fraction times the line spacing inches above the lowest point of the combination area. This is essentially an offset value. For example, a starting point of 0.2 with line spacing of 0.25 inches means the shading will start 0.05 inches from the lowest point of the shading area. This parameter can be used to create "interesting" hatching patterns.

After selecting this program, the user makes the appropriate answer set choice. Next, the user is presented with the first input screen, which consists of three input fields. The first input field is for entering the answer set name. The user enters the number of different area combinations to shade in the second input screen. The third input field is for entering the name of the shading control file. The Access Directory Button is used to browse the computer directory.

Following the first input screen are one or more input screens for entering a description (name) of each area combination. For each area combination, the user enters an optional description at the top. An input grid is shown for each of the five possible layers. Within each grid is the name of each area type within that layer, and a check box. To include the layer as part of this combination, check the box.

At the bottom of the screen each of three shading patterns can be defined. Normally, only one shading pattern is used. To "turn off" a pattern, select pen 0 (do not plot) for the pen color. For each pattern, choose the line spacing in feet/meters, the line offset factor (0 to 1), and the plot angle. To plot using rectangle fill instead of as lines, check the appropriate box.

After defining the shading control information, the user can elect to continue, in which case the program inputs are written to the shading control file. The user may also elect to quit the program, in which case all input is ignored.

3.9 Plot Filled Polygons

This choice allows the user to display filled polygons from an updated geology map. Its main function is in quickly checking section and plan maps of geology to see that they have been correctly digitized, and that no errors occurred in the update process.

After selecting this program, the user is requested to select an answer set. The first input screen is then displayed, which allows the user to select which maps to display, what control file to use, and control the plotting of the map title. The user can also override the default map limits, if desired.

The first input field is for the answer set name. The must then select one or more maps to display from the listing shown. If multiple maps are selected, then they are written to the plot file as separate plots within a single plot file. Thus, the "Skip Map" option comes into play. Refer to the MicroMODEL documentation for details.

The name of the polygon fill control file is entered in the "File Name" field. The Access Directory button can be used to browse the computer directory.

The map name can automatically be displayed at either the top of the map, or at the bottom of the map. Or, to eliminate display of the map name, select "No Display." If display at the top or bottom is chosen, then the pen color to use and the text size as a percent of map height must be specified. Be sure to use a text color that is different than any of the possible colors that will be used to display filled areas.

The "Override Limits" check box should be selected if the user wants to override the default map limits and use relative offset limits that are entered in the last four input fields. Normally, the default map limits are used so that the full map displays on the video screen. In some cases, however, the user may desire to override the default limits to display only a portion of the map. Leave this check box unselected to use default limits.

If default limits are overriden, then the relative minimum and maximum limits for the map are entered in the last four input fields. These relative limits are the distance measured from the original lower lefthand corner of the map in user units. For example, to display the first 200 units of map horizontally and the first 100 units of map vertically, the relative horizontal limits are set to 0 and 200; the relative vertical limits are set to 0 and 100.

After entering all responses, the user can elect to continue, in which case the a plot file is created, and the user can display it on screen. This plot file can also be converted to HP750C output or AutoCAD DXF.

An excellent use for these files is to display them as background plot files with the "Digitize Geology" program. Be sure to only display one map at a time in this case, since the digitizing program will only display the first plot contained in the plot file.

3.10 Create Polygon Fill Control File

This option allows the user to create a polygon fill control file that is used in conjunction with the program to plot filled polygons to screen. This file defines which area types will be displayed, and in what color and pattern type.

After selection this program, the user must select an answer set. After this, the user is presented with the first input screen which contains five input fields and a check box. The first input field is for entering the answer set name. The second input field is for entering the name of the polygon fill control file that is created.

The third input field is for entering the number of different area types that are to be displayed. This can be anything from zero to the number of area types that exist in the PolyMap project.

The fourth input field is for entering the number of different trace types to display. This can be anything from zero to the number of line types that exist in the PolyMap project.

The check box should be selected if an annotation file will be used. The fifth input field is used to enter the name of the annotation file. Unselect the check box if no annotation file will be used. Refer to section 3.18 for further information on annotation files.

Following the initial input screen are screens for defining area names and shading parameters, and screens for defining trace names and trace plotting parameters. The area definition screens contain two command buttons and an input field for each area name that will be displayed as a filled polygon. The first command button selects the area name, the second selects the fill type; hollow, solid, or hatch. The pen number for the fill color is entered in the input field.

The line definition screens contain two command buttons and an input field for each trace name that will be displayed. The first command button selects the trace name, the second selects the line style; solid, dashed, or dotted. The pen number for the line color is entered in the input field.

After entering the input values, the user may elect to continue, in which case the polygon fill control file is written. Otherwise, the user may quit the program and return to the PolyMap menu.